WHY BOYCOTT WENDY'S?

1) Wendy's abandoned the Florida tomato industry

Wendy's has not only refused to join the Fair Food Program (FFP), but has stopped buying tomatoes from Florida since the implementation of the FFP there. Rather than support an industry setting new standards for human rights, Wendy's took its tomato purchases to Mexico, where workers continue to confront wage theft, sexual harassment, child labor, and even slavery without access to protections.

2) WENDY'S HAS CHOSEN PUBLIC RELATIONS OVER HUMAN RIGHTS

Instead of joining the FFP and its widely-acclaimed, uniquely successful worker-driven model of social responsibility, Wendy's released a new supplier code of conduct that contains no effective mechanisms for worker participation or enforcement. Wendy's new code represents the very worst of the traditional corporate approach to social responsibility driven by public relations rather than human rights. 

3) WENDY'S IS PROFITING FROM FARMWORKER POVERTY

Wendy's stands alone as the last of the five major fast food corporations in the country to refuse to join the FFP: McDonald's, Burger King, Yum!Brands and Subway are all doing the right thing and participating in the Program. By refusing to join, Wendy's is deriving a very real cost advantage over its competitors, while continuing to provide an alternative market for less reputable growers. 

The Kaliroy Corporation, headquartered in Nogales, Arizona, with offices in McAllen, Texas, and Los Angeles, is the U.S. distribution arm of the major Mexican tomato grower, Bioparques de Occidente, which, according to the Los Angeles Times, produces up to 6 million boxes of the red fruit each year for the U.S. market—an enormous operation whose expansion has been fueled in part by a $17 million loan from the World Bank. As Kaliroy confirmed when I called, they are one of the suppliers to Wendy’s.

Bioparques workers who spoke to Times reporter Richard Marosi for an investigation published December 10, 2014, described subhuman conditions, with workers forced to work without pay, trapped for months at a time in scorpion-infested camps, often without beds, fed on scraps, and beaten when they tried to quit.
— Harper's Magazine, March 2016
“We are quite happy with the quality and taste of the tomatoes we are sourcing from Mexico.”
— Wendy's, October 2016